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Hrachya Arzumanian   1
  • 1 Ashkar Centre for Strategic Studies, 23a Tigran Metz Str., Stepanakert, 375000, Armenia

Models of Conflicts and a New Paradigm for the 21st Century Security Environment

2015, vol. 14, No. 4, pp. 129–139 [issue contents]
The last decades of world history have been described as an epoch of deep and rapid changes, compelling researchers to think of a new paradigm for the security environment, based on a refinement of principles, classification systems, and models of conflicts. The development of a new paradigm needs to be correctly formulated. It is necessary to understand clearly that new ideas and principles need to be connected with the collective experience of a society and its narratives, and to be related to practice. The modern meanings of notions and ideas are formed through immersion in history; analogies are developed as part of the process of interpretation and the creation of narrative. As a consequence, the politician and the researcher are on the edge of possible meanings, focusing the attention of society on the ideas society will be able comprehend and include in its narrative. The development of a paradigm is a difficult theoretical problem requiring both objectivity and subjectivity. The objective aspects are constant for historical epochs and cultures, which allows the use of the world’s treasury of experience and knowledge. Subjective aspects depend on the specifics of the society, leading to an intellectual phenomenon. The developoment of a new paradigm for the security environment of the post-soviet space, in virtue of its complexity, should be considered more art than science.
Citation: Arzumanian H. (2015) Modeli konfliktov i novaya paradigma sredy bezopasnosti XXI veka [Models of Conflicts and a New Paradigm for the 21st Century Security Environment]. The Russian Sociological Review, vol. 14, no 4, pp. 129-139 (in Russian). DOI: 10.17323/1728-192X-2015-4-129-139.
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The Russian Sociological Review
Office 403, 12 Petrovka Street,
Moscow 107031, Russia
Deputy Editor: Marina Pugacheva
 
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